About

Let’s face it.  Karate gets in your blood. And when you can’t practice for any length of time, it breaks the habit of training. Discipline slips. Motivation gives way to expediency.  Other things keep getting in the way.

Yet any diligent practitioner knows that regular practice is essential, both to retain knowledge and improve skills, as well as to develop new ones needed for advancement in the art.

Training at home is hard. There’s no class to attend at any particular time. No partner work on focus, targets, combinations or body distancing. No instructor to tell you what to practice or critique your efforts.  No one to teach you new techniques or hone your application of existing ones.

We try to provide you a foundation upon which to build, and encouragement and direction to keep pushing your boundaries and become a better karateka.

While we’re not yet clear on exactly how we’re going to do that or what our digital dojo will offer or look like once complete, we know we’re committed to advancing the art and your proficiency in it.

Hopefully that will be enough to help you get off the couch and get into a regular routine of self-training.  Why not get started today?

 


Roots and Affiliations

It should be noted that the training provided here (not the embedded videos, though) is that which is taught by the Goju Ryu Karate Do Kyokai, or GKK.  Their website is Goju.com

Please note that in addition to the traditional training, supplemental material may be introduced by individual instructors to round out the knowledge and ability of their students.  however, strict adherence to GKK core training will be maintained.

The organization was originally founded in 1959 by the late Sensei Jack Coleman, and affiliated under the Goju Kai organization of Shihan Gogen Yamaguchi.  Later the organization split from Yamaguchi and evolved to its current iteration.  You can read more about the organization here.

It currently has over 155 active black belt members, headed by the current Chairman, Shihan Motoo Yamakura, and the Assistant Chairman Sensei Richard Stamper. 

The materials on this site were curated and prepared by John Dennison, a ni dan (2nd degree), in Coral Springs, Florida.  John will be primarily responsible for all Goju at Home training, supplemented by guest instructors as appropriate.

John began his training in the Yamaguchi Goju Kai under Jack Coleman (and Richard Stamper) in 1971, and later trained extensively in tai chi chuan and bagua to understand and develop the use of qi and the softer aspects of the art.

True to our name, John trains his son Joe and others who care to learn at his home.  He started this site as a means to bring quality training and participation to GKK and other karateka around the world sidelined by COVID lockdowns.

Training and rank provided by this site attempt to comport with all of the GKK’s standards and requirements for technique, proficiency and especially character development.  We will endeavor to impart those standards to all who train with us here.

All participants will be required to join and complete the GKK membership application. Your dojo will be GojuatHome.com.  Browsing on the site does not require membership, and is available to the public without charge.

It should be noted that the videos embedded on this site are not GKK practioners or endorsed by them.  While videos of Shihan Yamakura are available through the GKK, due to copyright restrictions and personal promises they have not been uploaded to the site. 

However, the versions performed by Sensei Furukawa on many of the kata are similar to those performed by Chairmaan Yamakura and the rest of the GKK.  Any such variations are minor and will be pointed out by your instructor at the appropriate time (experienced practitioners will note that minor differences exist throughout the various goju and other Okinawan lineages, and do not impair learning or practice of the kata).

Since karate and associated training carries with it a risk of serious physical injury, and in some cases even death, practitioners are advised to consult with their physicians to insure they are in good health before beginning training of any kind. 

In addition, they are admonished to use discretion and only perform such movements and techniques as they can safely do so.